DIA MEDIA RELEASE: CONFERENCE GUIDELINES

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Dementia Alliance International is today launching the first edition of our conference guidelines based on feedback from people with dementia and family care partners since 2012.

Of course, it was not possible to receive feedback from the more than 47 million people currently diagnosed with dementia, but we did engage with hundreds of people from more than 12 countries.

Your feedback is important, and if you have ways in which the next edition of this document could be improved, we would appreciate hearing from you.

“Because members of Dementia Alliance International (DAI) have a unique perspective on conferences we decided to assemble responses from post-event informal email surveys of the past four years to see how people with demen a and care partners feel about the access, support, and enablement provided at professional mee ngs of Alzheimer’s Disease Interna onal (ADI) and other conferences or events.

In other words, we asked if such events are dementia friendly, accessible, and accommoda ng for people of all ages and disabilities.”

You can download the full report here supporting-and-accommodating-people-with-dementia-at-conferences-and-other-events_2016, or email us for printed copies atinfo@infodai.org

 

Preventing Cognitive Decline and Dementia: A Way Forward

Published on Oct 2, 2017

In a 2017 report, a committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine evaluated the most rigorous, up-to-date research on how to prevent cognitive decline and dementia, as well as recommended ways to conduct future prevention research. This video, featuring several members of the committee, highlights the report’s conclusions and recommendations.

NIA’s Alzheimer’s Caring Guide in Spanish

Looking for Alzheimer’s caregiving information in Spanish?

Check out Cómo cuidar a una persona con la enfermedad de Alzheimer: Una guía fácil de usar del Instituto Nacional Sobre el Envejecimiento.

This new book from the National Institute on Aging (part of the National Institutes on Health) has helpful tips on topics including: changes in behavior; wandering; healthy eating and exercise; and caregiver health.

Copies are available to order for free on our website, or read the new Alzheimer’s caregiving information in Spanish online.

Dementia Friendly Village Model

Need inspiration for how other communities have tried to improve the well-being and socialization of persons with dementia.  This article in The Atlantic from 2014 about the “dementia village” in Hogeway, The Netherlands, is one prototype.  If an entire village designed for the needs of persons with dementia is not likely in your community, what elements can be used to make your community more “dementia friendly?”

“The environmental approaches to reducing both cognitive and behavioral problems associated with dementia are really the key to improving quality of life for these patients without excess medication.”

Dr. Paul Newhouse, Director of Vanderbilt University’s Center for Cognitive Medicine.

 

Dementia Specific Care Coordination Models

Are there any examples of dementia-specific care coordination models, particularly models that help individuals navigate health care and community resources?

Minnesota

Minnesota offers dementia care best practice training for care coordinators and has created a practice tool for care coordinators along with a training description and video tutorials.

Care Coordination Practice Tool

Training description

Video tutorials – scroll to bottom of the page

National

A report on care coordination for people with dementia and family caregivers also has been released.

 

Training Curriculum: Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias

Currently, more than five million Americans live with Alzheimer’s disease. Training for the primary care workforce about dementia, and caring for those affected, is essential.

With federal partners and public stakeholders, the Health Resources and Services Administration created a curriculum—16 core modules and four supplemental modules—for health educators to train the primary care workforce about dementia care, and to help providers address caregiver needs.

To promote interprofessional teamwork in the care of persons living with dementia, this curriculum may be used by:

  • Health professions faculty
  • Students
  • Primary care practitioners
  • Members of the interprofessional geriatrics care team
  • Direct service workers

Modules 1-12 contain information about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias of particular interest to the primary care workforce. Modules 13-16 specify the roles of specific health care professions in dementia care.  All 16 core modules include a PowerPoint presentation, with detailed notes, and a reference list, to assist with teaching and presentations.

The modules focus primarily on outpatient rather than residential care because the majority of persons living with dementia remain in their homes during the earlier, and some even through later stages, of dementia.

The curriculum modules can be accessed here.

Module List

Module 1: Overview of Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia for an Interprofessional Team
Module 2: Diagnosing Dementia
Module 3: Recognizing the Role of Diversity in Dementia Care   
Module 4: Providing and Discussing a Dementia Diagnosis
Module 5: Understanding Early-Stage Dementia for an Interprofessional Team
Module 6: Understanding the Middle Stage of Dementia for the Interprofessional Team
Module 7: Management of Common Medical Conditions Observed During Middle and Late Stages of Dementia
Module 8: Medical Treatments of Dementia
Module 9: Interprofessional Team Roles and Responsibilities
Module 10: Effective Care Transitions to and from Acute Care Hospitals
Module 11: Ethics and Capacity Issues
Module 12: Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Persons Living with Dementia
Module 13: Clinical Social Workers and Clinical Psychologists: Practicing with Persons Living with Dementia and their Care Partners 
Module 14: The Role of Acute Care Staff in Emergency Departments (EDs) and Hospitals for Persons Living with Dementia
Module 15: Role of the Pharmacist in the Management of Persons living with dementia
Module 16: Dentistry and Dementia

Creating Partnerships to Provide the Saavy Caregiver Program

Shawnee Alliance in collaboration with SIU-Family Practice Memory Clinic, SIU-School of Social Work Dr. Elaine Jurkowski and the Carbondale Regional Alzheimer representative will be offering the Savvy Caregiver Program course starting in September 28th thru November 2nd.

To reach the persons we feel could benefit, the Memory Clinic will be reaching out to their patients and Shawnee Alliance will be reaching out to Family Caregiver clients we are aware of.

There are a few unique opportunities being offered:

  • The care receivers will either be in the Memory Clinic testing or being cared for by Dr. Jurkowski “Cognitive Stimulation Therapy (CST)” group.
  • The care givers will be in the “Savvy Caregiver” program.
  • All will be located in the Memorial Hospital of Carbondale complex, with ADS in Carbondale also being approached to assist if unable to participate in the CST.
  • We will have telephonic access available as well as Care Coordinators from Shawnee Alliance will offer face to face in the home if necessary.

For more information about the program (or how to think about setting up a similar one in your community), please contact:

Marsha Nelson
Community Service Unit Director
Shawnee Alliance
Phone:  618-985-8322 or 618-956-9627