DIA MEDIA RELEASE: CONFERENCE GUIDELINES

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Dementia Alliance International is today launching the first edition of our conference guidelines based on feedback from people with dementia and family care partners since 2012.

Of course, it was not possible to receive feedback from the more than 47 million people currently diagnosed with dementia, but we did engage with hundreds of people from more than 12 countries.

Your feedback is important, and if you have ways in which the next edition of this document could be improved, we would appreciate hearing from you.

“Because members of Dementia Alliance International (DAI) have a unique perspective on conferences we decided to assemble responses from post-event informal email surveys of the past four years to see how people with demen a and care partners feel about the access, support, and enablement provided at professional mee ngs of Alzheimer’s Disease Interna onal (ADI) and other conferences or events.

In other words, we asked if such events are dementia friendly, accessible, and accommoda ng for people of all ages and disabilities.”

You can download the full report here supporting-and-accommodating-people-with-dementia-at-conferences-and-other-events_2016, or email us for printed copies atinfo@infodai.org

 

Defeat Depression in Caregivers

Try these activities with a person with Alzheimer’s

e-UPDATE from the ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE EDUCATION & REFERRAL CENTER

National Institute on Aging sent this bulletin at 10/10/2017 12:45 PM EDT

Household chores: Wash dishes, set the table, prepare food, sweep the floor, dust, sort mail and clip coupons, sort socks and fold laundry.

  • Cooking and baking: Decide what is needed to prepare the dish; measure, mix, and pour; tell someone else how to prepare a recipe; watch others prepare food.
  • Exercise: Take a walk together, watch exercise videos made for older people, use a stationary bike, use stretching bands, throw a soft ball or balloon back and forth, lift weights or household items such as soup cans.
  • Music and dancing: Play music, talk about the music and the singer, ask what the person with Alzheimer’s was doing when the song was popular, sing or dance to well-known songs, attend a concert or musical program.
  • Pets: Feed, groom, walk, sit and hold a pet.
  • Gardening: Take care of indoor or outdoor plants, plant flowers and vegetables, water the plants when needed, talk about how much the plants are growing.
  • Visiting with children: Play a simple board game, read stories or books, visit family members who have small children, walk in the park or around schoolyards, go to school events, talk about fond memories from childhood.

Learn more about adapting activities for people with Alzheimer’s disease.

Share this information on social media:

Twitter: People w/ #Alzheimers may have trouble deciding what to do each day. You can help! Check out a list of activities: http://bit.ly/2y9Sidk

Facebook: People with Alzheimer’s still enjoy participating in a wide variety of activities. Try involving them in simple activities like household chores, cooking, exercise, dancing, or visiting with children. Visit the National Institute on Aging’s website to get more ideas on adapting activities for people with Alzheimer’s:http://bit.ly/2xwAbMR

 

Preventing Cognitive Decline and Dementia: A Way Forward

Published on Oct 2, 2017

In a 2017 report, a committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine evaluated the most rigorous, up-to-date research on how to prevent cognitive decline and dementia, as well as recommended ways to conduct future prevention research. This video, featuring several members of the committee, highlights the report’s conclusions and recommendations.

Encouraging but Inconclusive: Interventions that May Help Prevent Cognitive Decline and Dementia

Published on Oct 2, 2017

In a 2017 report, a committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine evaluated the most rigorous, up-to-date research on how to prevent cognitive decline and dementia, as well as recommended ways to conduct future prevention research. This video, featuring several members of the committee, outlines the three interventions named by the committee: cognitive training, blood pressure management for those with hypertension, and increased physical activity.

Dementia Friendly Village Model

Need inspiration for how other communities have tried to improve the well-being and socialization of persons with dementia.  This article in The Atlantic from 2014 about the “dementia village” in Hogeway, The Netherlands, is one prototype.  If an entire village designed for the needs of persons with dementia is not likely in your community, what elements can be used to make your community more “dementia friendly?”

“The environmental approaches to reducing both cognitive and behavioral problems associated with dementia are really the key to improving quality of life for these patients without excess medication.”

Dr. Paul Newhouse, Director of Vanderbilt University’s Center for Cognitive Medicine.

 

Dementia Specific Care Coordination Models

Are there any examples of dementia-specific care coordination models, particularly models that help individuals navigate health care and community resources?

Minnesota

Minnesota offers dementia care best practice training for care coordinators and has created a practice tool for care coordinators along with a training description and video tutorials.

Care Coordination Practice Tool

Training description

Video tutorials – scroll to bottom of the page

National

A report on care coordination for people with dementia and family caregivers also has been released.