How Alzheimer’s affects the brain

In Alzheimer’s disease, changes to the brain likely start a decade or more before memory and other cognitive problems appear. This new video developed by the National Institute on Aging shows what we’ve learned about the brain in Alzheimer’s, and where research on treating or curing the disease is headed.

Learn more about what happens to the brain during Alzheimer’s disease.

The National Research Summit on Care, Services and Supports for Persons with Dementia and Their Caregivers

The National Research Summit on Care, Services and Supports for Persons with Dementia and Their Caregivers is a two-day meeting of researchers, service providers, persons with dementia, family caregivers, and other stakeholder groups.

It will be held October 16-17, 2017, at the Natcher Building’s Ruth L. Kirschstein Auditorium of the NIH in Bethesda, Maryland. NIA’s Division of Behavioral and Social Research (NIA/DBSR) would like to encourage you to attend this Research Summit. The meeting is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health through private sector support.

In-person registration is now full. The wait list also has reached its capacity. If you would still like to participate in this meeting, you may register for the videocast option.  By registering, you will receive an email with videocast details approximately one week before the Summit. You can register here.

The Summit is intended to identify what we know now and what we still need to learn in order to accelerate the development, evaluation, translation, implementation, and scaling up of comprehensive care, services, and supports for persons with dementia, families, and other caregivers. The Summit is focused on research that is needed to improve quality of person-and family-centered care and outcomes across care settings, including quality of life and the lived experience of persons with dementia and their caregivers.

 

Tips for dealing with forgetfulness

People experiencing forgetfulness can use a variety of techniques that may help them stay healthy and deal with changes in their memory and mental skills.

Here are some things to try:

  • Learn a new skill.
  • Stay involved in activities that can help both the mind and body.
  • Volunteer in your community, at a school, or at your place of worship.
  • Spend time with friends and family.
  • Use memory tools such as big calendars, to-do lists, and notes to yourself.
  • Put your wallet or purse, keys, and glasses in the same place each day.
  • Don’t drink too much alcohol.
  • Get help if you feel depressed for weeks at a time.

Visit the ADEAR website to get more tips and learn about what to do if you start noticing memory problems.

Exercising with Alzheimer’s

Regular exercise can have many benefits for people with Alzheimer’s disease, though some people may have trouble getting around during the later stages. If the person with Alzheimer’s has trouble with tasks like walking, choose gentle forms of exercise like:

  • Simple household chores like sweeping and dusting
  • Riding a stationary bike
  • Using soft rubber exercise balls or balloons for stretching or throwing back and forth
  • Using stretching bands
  • Lifting weights or household items (such as water bottles)

Check out Go4Life, the exercise and physical activity campaign from the National Institute on Aging, for more ways to be active.

NIA/ACL/CDC Alzheimer’s and Related Dementias Webinar Series for Professionals

Get up to speed on the latest in Alzheimer’s and dementia, and learn what you need to know to inform, educate, and empower community members, people with dementia, and family caregivers. Presented by the National Institute on Aging (NIA/NIH), the Administration for Community Living (ACL), and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

Free continuing education credit is available (CNE, CEU, and CECH)!

Webinar 1: Alzheimer’s and Dementia Resources You Can Use
Wednesday, March 1, 2017

1:00-2:30pm Eastern Time
Noon-1:30 Central Time
11:00am-12:30pm Mountain Time
10:00-11:30am Pacific Time

To register: go to nih.webex.com, enter event # 628 629 619

This webinar will provide an update on Alzheimer’s and dementia issues and resources, including:

• What’s new with consumer, caregiver, and professional resources on dementia

• Helpful resources on areas of special interest:
o Veterans and their caregivers
o Financial exploitation
o Depression & dementia

• How the federal government is implementing the National Alzheimer’s Plan, including the overall direction of the plan and its 2017 changes

Presenters:
• Tanya Friese, DNP, RN, CNL USN (Ret.), Assistant Professor, College of Nursing and Educational Coordinator, Road Home Program, Rush University Medical Center

• Peter Lichtenberg, PhD, Director, Institute of Gerontology and Professor of Psychology, Wayne State University

• Lisa McGuire, PhD, Lead, Alzheimer’s Disease and Healthy Aging Program, CDC

• Mark Snowden, MD, MPH, Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington

• Amy Wiatr-Rodriguez, MSW, Aging Services Program Specialist, ACL

Sign Up for NIA’s New Caregiving E-Mail List

Caregivers—get helpful resources delivered straight to your inbox! Sign up for the NIA for Caregivers list and receive biweekly e-mails with information and tips about:

• Alzheimer’s caregiving
• Long-distance caregiving
• Caregiver health, and more!