Help people with Alzheimer’s stay safe in cold weather

As winter weather heads our way, be prepared to help people with Alzheimer’s stay safe in cold weather. Make sure the person has the following supplies available:

• Warm clothing and blankets
• Medications
• Flashlights and extra batteries in case power goes out
• Food that is easy to prepare
• Incontinence undergarments, if needed

Older adults are particularly vulnerable to hypothermia in cold weather. Review this brochure to help prevent hypothermia this winter.

Help a person with Alzheimer’s prepare for doctor visits

Caregivers play an important role in helping people with mid-to-late stage Alzheimer’s communicate with their doctors.

Make the most out of your time with the doctor with these tips:
• Make a list of what you and the person with Alzheimer’s want to discuss.
• Prioritize your concerns so you talk about the most important issues first.
• Plan to update the doctor on any changes in health, behavior, or medication side effects.
• Take lists of all medications for the doctor to review. This includes prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal remedies or supplements.
Learn more about getting the most out of doctor’s appointments.
Caregivers—remember that you need regular check-ups, too! Book your annual doctor’s visit today.

Become a Dementia Friend

Dementia Friendly America, a national collaborative just launched the Dementia Friends program in the United States. Dementia Friends is a global initiative that began in the United Kingdom and aims to empower and educate individuals about dementia.

Dementia Friends is designed to raise awareness about dementia and educate individuals and communities about how they can best support and interact with people living with dementia.

The program accomplishes this via an online training that includes a series of short videos and encourages people to commit to take action. A brief introductory video about the aim of the program is available.

Become a Dementia Friend by going to www.DementiaFriendsUSA.org. From there you can become a Dementia Friend by committing to an activity that will help someone in your community with dementia.

If a family member has Alzheimer’s, will I get it?

A family history of Alzheimer’s disease does not mean for sure that you’ll have it. But, it may mean you are more likely to develop it.

Check out the following infographic from the National Institute on Aging to learn more about how a family history of Alzheimer’s may affect you.

ad-genetics-infographic

Help keep your brain healthy as you age!

As we age, our brains go through changes. The good news is that you can do to help maintain your cognitive function. Check out Cognitive Health and Older Adults, a new web-page resource from the National Institute on Aging at NIH, to learn about:

• Taking care of your brain
• Risks to cognitive health
• Memory and thinking
• The aging brain
• Cognitive health research

Please share this resource with others who may want to find credible information about maintaining a healthy brain.

PBS Documentary – Alzheimer’s: Every Minute Counts airs on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 @ 9:00 p.m. CENTRAL time.

Dementia Friendly America and Dementia Friends USA is partnering with PBS as they launch a documentary called Alzheimer’s: Every Minute Counts.

The 60-minute documentary airs on Wednesday, January 25th at 9:00 p.m. Central Time. Viewers will be guided to a website that provides them with links that enable them to become a Dementia Friend or start a dementia friendly community, among other things.

Watch clips of the documentary here.

Follow social media conversations at #EveryMinuteCountsPBS

Engagement, promotion & social media tools can be found at http://bit.ly/EveryMinuteCountsPressKit

Exercise for Persons with Dementia

Exercise helps keep their muscles, joints, and heart in good shape, while also helping maintain a healthy weight and promote good sleep.

Being active and getting exercise helps people with Alzheimer’s disease feel better.

Here are some tips to get started:
• Be realistic about how much activity can be done at one time. Several 10-minute “mini-workouts” may be best.
• Make sure the person with Alzheimer’s disease has an ID bracelet with your phone number if he or she walks alone.
• Break exercises into simple, easy-to-follow steps.
• Take a walk together each day. Exercise is good for caregivers, too!

Read this tip sheet to learn more about exercise and physical activity for people with Alzheimer’s disease.