Illinois Cognitive Resources Network

Connecting to resources throughout your dementia journey

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Myths about Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer’s disease is a leading cause of death in the United States, and millions of Americans are affected by the disease. It’s important to distinguish the facts from the myths about Alzheimer’s, especially when it comes to finding information online. A few common myths surrounding this disease are:

  • Alzheimer’s and dementia are the same thing. People often use the terms “Alzheimer’s disease” and “dementia” interchangeably, but there is a difference. Dementia refers to impaired memory, thinking, reasoning, and behavior, and Alzheimer’s is just one type of dementia.
  • I will develop Alzheimer’s if my parent has it. A person’s chance of developing Alzheimer’s is higher if they have certain genetic variants passed down from a parent. However, just because a biological parent has Alzheimer’s does not mean that their children will develop it.
  • Alzheimer’s disease symptoms are normal as we get older. Many people become more forgetful as they age, and some forgetfulness is normal. However, the signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s are not a normal part of aging.

Read about more common myths and get the facts about Alzheimer’s disease.

The Sounds Good Choir Hosting Free Holiday Sing-A-Long for Older Adults

The Sounds Good Choir will be hosting FREE Holiday Sing-A-Long for older adults every Friday from 11:45 AM – 12:45 PM! Join in the holiday spirit, singing songs you love! Join through Zoom or simply by calling in through your telephone. Learn more and register at: https://soundsgoodchoir.org/sg-sing-along/

Optimism Linked to Longevity, the Connection Between Alzheimer’s and Cholesterol, Novel Blood Biomarkers in Parkinson’s, and More

Check out the latest in aging advances, research, and events from NIA:

Myths about Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer’s disease is a leading cause of death in the United States, and millions of Americans are affected by the disease. It’s important to distinguish the facts from the myths about Alzheimer’s, especially when it comes to finding information online. A few common myths surrounding this disease are:

  • Alzheimer’s and dementia are the same thing. People often use the terms “Alzheimer’s disease” and “dementia” interchangeably, but there is a difference. Dementia refers to impaired memory, thinking, reasoning, and behavior, and Alzheimer’s is just one type of dementia.
  • I will develop Alzheimer’s if my parent has it. A person’s chance of developing Alzheimer’s is higher if they have certain genetic variants passed down from a parent. However, just because a biological parent has Alzheimer’s does not mean that their children will develop it.
  • Alzheimer’s disease symptoms are normal as we get older. Many people become more forgetful as they age, and some forgetfulness is normal. However, the signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s are not a normal part of aging.

Read about more common myths and get the facts about Alzheimer’s disease.

Lorenzo’s House Shifting the Narrative Event Shines the Spotlight on Younger-Onset Dementia

CALLING ALL HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS, THOSE LIVING WITH OR AFFECTED BY YOUNGER-ONSET DEMENTIA, & INDIVIDUALS INTERESTED IN LEARNING MORE! Please bring your questions, experience and ideas to share with our expert panelist!

Click here to register today:

LA BROCHA Hosting Art Event for People Living With Dementia and Parkinson’s Disease

LA Brocha and community partners are excited to welcome attendees to this in-person event that will be loaded with beautiful art and art activities.

Artist to offer art activities: Luz Elivier Godina

Mark your calendars for:

Saturday, December 17th, 11am to 2pm

National Museum of Mexican Art, 1852 W. 19th St., in Chicago

To register call 708-858-1323 or email us at LaBrochaChicago@gmail.com

Caring for Yourself as an Alzheimer’s Caregiver

Being a caregiver can be extremely rewarding, but it can also be overwhelming. Caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia takes time and effort. It can feel lonely and frustrating, so it is important to find time to take care of yourself. Consider these tips:

  • Ask for help when you need it. Reach out to family members and friends for help or contact local services for additional care needs.
  • Take breaks each day. Try making a cup of tea or calling a friend.
  • Join a caregiver’s support group online or in person. Meeting other caregivers will give you a chance to share stories and ideas and can help keep you from feeling isolated.

Find more ways you can care for yourself as an Alzheimer’s caregiver.