Try these activities with a person with Alzheimer’s

e-UPDATE from the ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE EDUCATION & REFERRAL CENTER

National Institute on Aging sent this bulletin at 10/10/2017 12:45 PM EDT

Household chores: Wash dishes, set the table, prepare food, sweep the floor, dust, sort mail and clip coupons, sort socks and fold laundry.

  • Cooking and baking: Decide what is needed to prepare the dish; measure, mix, and pour; tell someone else how to prepare a recipe; watch others prepare food.
  • Exercise: Take a walk together, watch exercise videos made for older people, use a stationary bike, use stretching bands, throw a soft ball or balloon back and forth, lift weights or household items such as soup cans.
  • Music and dancing: Play music, talk about the music and the singer, ask what the person with Alzheimer’s was doing when the song was popular, sing or dance to well-known songs, attend a concert or musical program.
  • Pets: Feed, groom, walk, sit and hold a pet.
  • Gardening: Take care of indoor or outdoor plants, plant flowers and vegetables, water the plants when needed, talk about how much the plants are growing.
  • Visiting with children: Play a simple board game, read stories or books, visit family members who have small children, walk in the park or around schoolyards, go to school events, talk about fond memories from childhood.

Learn more about adapting activities for people with Alzheimer’s disease.

Share this information on social media:

Twitter: People w/ #Alzheimers may have trouble deciding what to do each day. You can help! Check out a list of activities: http://bit.ly/2y9Sidk

Facebook: People with Alzheimer’s still enjoy participating in a wide variety of activities. Try involving them in simple activities like household chores, cooking, exercise, dancing, or visiting with children. Visit the National Institute on Aging’s website to get more ideas on adapting activities for people with Alzheimer’s:http://bit.ly/2xwAbMR

 

Preventing Cognitive Decline and Dementia: A Way Forward

Published on Oct 2, 2017

In a 2017 report, a committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine evaluated the most rigorous, up-to-date research on how to prevent cognitive decline and dementia, as well as recommended ways to conduct future prevention research. This video, featuring several members of the committee, highlights the report’s conclusions and recommendations.

Encouraging but Inconclusive: Interventions that May Help Prevent Cognitive Decline and Dementia

Published on Oct 2, 2017

In a 2017 report, a committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine evaluated the most rigorous, up-to-date research on how to prevent cognitive decline and dementia, as well as recommended ways to conduct future prevention research. This video, featuring several members of the committee, outlines the three interventions named by the committee: cognitive training, blood pressure management for those with hypertension, and increased physical activity.